Types of Law Enforcement Funerals

Most departments would categorize decedents into one of five general categories: Sworn Civilian Retired Separated Immediate family member The type of funeral and level of honors accorded these decedents depends on both their category and the circumstances of death.


Law Enforcement Funeral Customs

Law Enforcement (Police) Funeral Service Rituals

Law Enforcement Funerals Law enforcement officers pledge to serve the public good and put their lives on the line daily. When they pass away, whether from circumstances in the line of duty or otherwise, their funerals should reflect honor and respect for their service and dedication.


Funeralwise Photo Contests

Funeralwise 2016 Memorial Day Photo Contest $500 Grand Prize for the best cemetery image evoking the meaning of Memorial Day About the Contest


Firefighter Funeral Definitions

Definition of Words relating to Firefighter Funeral Services Badge presentationThe Fire Chief may wish to make a formal presentation of the name tag and badge worn by the fallen firefighter to the next of kin. The badge and tag should be in a framed shadow box or display that also includes a department uniform patch.


Types of Firefighter Funerals

Generally there are three types or levels of firefighter deaths resulting in a department funeral: Line of duty death (LODD): the firefighter died while on duty or died after an incident that was the direct cause of the later death. Full military-style honors. Non-LODD for an active or uniformed firefighter. Department funeral with some military-style honors.


Firefighter Funerals & Memorial Service Rituals and Customs

It is fitting and right that firefighters, who put their lives at risk daily for the public, should be given the proper respect upon their passing. A large part of this respect includes fire department traditions, which play an important role in honoring firefighters who have passed. Full military-style honors are accorded to those heroes who die in the line of duty.


Good Etiquette Guide for the Surviving Family – Day of Visitation or Funeral

The following etiquette guide for the bereaved on the days of the visitation and service are listed in alphabetical order: Clothing/Dress You are not required to wear black to the funeral; however, showing respect and honor for your loved one’s memory does require wearing conservative clothing that reflects this sense of dignity and decorum. Bright colors and loud patterns may send the wrong message to your visitors and other mourners and family members.


Etiquette for the Surviving Family: Planning the Funeral

Arranging the Funeral Now that Your Loved One Has Died A funeral is a formal service of remembrance with the body present, in either a closed or open casket. Your funeral director or clergy can advise you on many aspects of etiquette relating to the actual funeral service. If your loved one hasn’t preplanned, you will need to make a number of decisions:


Attending Funeral Services: Your Funeral Etiquette Questions Answered

The Day of the Funeral or Memorial Service Should you attend the funeral? Unless the obituary says it’s a private service, then you can assume the public is welcome, and you should go. Until you’ve lost a family member yourself, you won’t understand what a comfort it is to the family to see “a full church [and] the pews packed with people who also care for and remember the deceased. … The family knows that attending a funeral is inconvenient, and that’s why they’ll never forget that you came.” (from The Art of Manliness)


Seminole Indian Funeral Service Rituals

When it comes to the funeral traditions of any religious, ethnic or geographical group, it is typical for specific customs to vary from family to family. The Florida Seminoles are no exception to this rule. However, experts on Seminole traditions still have much to say about the funeral customs that characterize their group. Seminole Indian Funeral Traditions


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