Bereaved Etiquette for Day of Funeral

Good Etiquette Guide for the Surviving Family – Day of Visitation or Funeral

The following etiquette guide for the bereaved on the days of the visitation and service are listed in alphabetical order: Clothing/Dress You are not required to wear black to the funeral; however, showing respect and honor for your loved one’s memory does require wearing conservative clothing that reflects this sense of dignity and decorum. Bright colors and loud patterns may send the wrong message to your visitors and other mourners and family members.


Etiquette for the Surviving Family: Planning the Funeral

Arranging the Funeral Now that Your Loved One Has Died A funeral is a formal service of remembrance with the body present, in either a closed or open casket. Your funeral director or clergy can advise you on many aspects of etiquette relating to the actual funeral service. If your loved one hasn’t preplanned, you will need to make a number of decisions:




Chinese Funeral Service Rituals

In the Chinese culture, cremation is uncommon. As a result of this, burial of the dead is of utmost importance to the Chinese people. If the burial is carried out incorrectly, it is believed that disaster and bad luck will plague the family of the deceased.


Atheist Funeral Service Rituals

Atheist funerals — usually quite similar to humanist funerals — are becoming more and more common. They are appropriate memorials to those who lived their lives without religious affiliation and reject the typically religious views associated with life and death.


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Hindu Beliefs on Dying and Death

Balinese Cremation TowerHindu death practices follow a similar overarching pattern with some variation by family tradition, caste, or sect. The family is the most important part of a sacred funeral rite.


Pentecostal Funeral Service Rituals

Pentecostal funeral customs are similar to other Christian funeral traditions. The service traditionally takes place at the church, but it may also be conducted at a funeral home or at the site of the grave. In the past it has been the custom to wear black at Pentecostal funeral services. However, white is more frequently being used to symbolize the Pentecostal belief in the resurrection of the body.


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